Physical education in philippines

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Physical education in philippines

June 06, In evaluating the curriculum for primary schools, it is important to examine what children are in fact doing inside the school. This goes far beyond the sound bites we hear from education policy makers or reformers.

The class schedule showing the time allotment for each subject is highly informative, providing a dimension one does not see by simply browsing through a list of content standards or a curriculum.

With the oral fluency in English added in the second half of the year, the total instructional time per day is minutes or 4 hours. This information can then be combined with the following schedule found in schools that employ triple shifts: The first shift begins at 6 a.

Physical education in philippines

Each shift is four hours long. Of course, a hour day can only be divided into three 4-hour shifts with no breaks between them. Not only does the new curriculum excludes science, and reading and writing in English, it does exclude Recess.

Physical Activity and Physical Education in Schools

The situation in the United States is equally disturbing because of the current emphasis on standardized tests which focus on reading and mathematics.

With funding and bonuses tied to the performance of students in these subjects, schools are neglecting the other subjects including physical activity and physical education. Yes, recess gets the cut because students need to sit on their desks longer doing additions, subtractions, multiplications and divisions.

With social media especially Facebook, text messaging, and video games, the time allotted for medium and vigorous physical activity is indeed dwindling.

For this reason, the Institute of Medicine in the United States has recently raised its voice against the decreasing amount of time given to physical activity and physical education in US schools. The following is a video from the institute: Among the recommendations of the institute are the following: All elementary school students should spend an average of 30 minutes per day and all middle and high school students an average of 45 minutes per day in physical education class.

To allow for flexibility in curriculum scheduling, this recommendation is equivalent to minutes per week for elementary school students and minutes per week for middle and high school students.

The Institute of Medicine also adds: A growing body of evidence also suggests a relationship between vigorous and moderate intensity physical activity and the structure and functioning of the brain. Children who are more active show greater attention, have faster cognitive processing speed, and perform better on standardized academic tests than children who are less active.

Of course, academic performance is influenced by other factors as well, such as parental involvement and socioeconomic status.

Nevertheless, ensuring that children and adolescents achieve at least the recommended amount of vigorous or moderate-intensity physical activity may well improve overall academic performance.Philippines is the third largest English speaking country in the world which will make things easier for international students.

Top Courses in Physical Education in Philippines / Read More. Teaching physical education in schools in the Philippines is a fantastic way for volunteers with a passion for sport and fitness to impact students’ lives. Philippines is the third largest English speaking country in the world which will make things easier for international students.

Top Courses in Physical Education in Philippines Read More. Department of Physical Education UP Manila, Manila, Philippines. likes.

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Official Facebook Like Page of DPE UP Manila. A blog that tackles issues on basic education (in the Philippines and the United States) including early childhood education, the teaching profession, math and science education, medium of instruction, poverty, and the role of research and higher education.

Physical education in philippines

A blog that tackles issues on basic education (in the Philippines and the United States) including early childhood education, the teaching profession, math and science education, medium of instruction, poverty, and the role of research and higher education.

Education in the Philippines - Wikipedia